Venezuela

Discussion of the basic concepts and philosophy behind the idea of a Sanctuary; a place where those exhibiting traits of the next generation of man can meet and learn, without prejudice or bias.
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South América

Post by cointreau » Fri Mar 30, 2007 8:12 am

Hello There, long time no see! How are you all doing? A lot has happened in my life since we saw each other in Avalon, but for the sake of simplicity I will just say this time around that I am back in my native country (Venezuela in South America), I will fill in the gaps later, (feel free to ask).

I see that LB is entertaining the possibility of starting an intentional community in S.A. and would like to offer my help since I am the only one already there (and won't have to buy the latest edition of Spanish for Dummies in order to get around). I've heard of similar projects already in existence in an area of the Venezuelan Amazon called Canaima, the place that was the inspiration for the book "The lost world" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. This is also a hot spot for UFO sightings which is one of the many reasons for such communities to exist around that area.

http://www.ufologie.net/indexe.htm

The most famous community is called Paují where people from all over the world has gathered to peacefully enjoy the beauty of the scenery http://www.lagransabana.com/english/pauji.htm (the rest of the web site where this was extracted from is an excelent source of info in English, feel free to peruse)

Home to the oldest geologic formations on Earth, this particular region is on top of what is known to geologists as the Guyana shield which is one of the most stable regions of the world (no eathquakes), there are no hurricanes or floods either although there is a very intense rainy season . There is water everywhere and plenty of food. It is a truly magical place. more pictures here: http://www.lagransabana.com/wallpapers.htm

Here I found a couple of nice videos on you tube about the region http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGX4G8m2 ... ed&search=

another good one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zqslqrst ... ed&search=

there is plenty info out there just type La gran sabana, venezuela or simply angel falls

I also read L.B mentioning Argentina which is a good place as well, however, due to its latitude, only the northern part of the country, the province of Misiones, would be desirable for such project, otherwise snow and extreme temperatures come into the equation. My best friend happens to be from that region and has spoken to me extensively about it, it is also a beautiful and magical place highlighted by the iguazú waterfalls, no shortage of water here either http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_T0-w6L57Y

I am very glad to communicate with all of you again, Let me know what you think and if you are still thinking about this project since the last posting was over a year ago.

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South America

Post by Starlight* » Fri Mar 30, 2007 12:17 pm

Hi, J

it's good to hear from you.

Last time I remember, LB was searching for the Holy Grail, :lol: , now you would think he knows better than that.
cointreau wrote:see that LB is entertaining the possibility of starting an intentional community in S.A. and would like to offer my help since I am the only one already there (and won't have to buy the latest edition of Spanish for Dummies in order to get around). I've heard of similar projects already in existence in an area of the Venezuelan Amazon called Canaima, the place that was the inspiration for the book "The lost world" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. This is also a hot spot for UFO sightings which is one of the many reasons for such communities to exist around that area.
Well I guess that makes two who do not have to buy the book. Though at my current job, I did find I had to use the legal dictionary to translate. The legal terminology is a whole different ballgame. And funny how the last two jobs have been centered around those who need someone to translate for them. As it's been said before, practice makes perfect.
cointreau wrote:I also read L.B mentioning Argentina which is a good place as well, however, due to its latitude, only the northern part of the country, the province of Misiones, would be desirable for such project, otherwise snow and extreme temperatures come into the equation. My best friend happens to be from that region and has spoken to me extensively about it, it is also a beautiful and magical place highlighted by the iguazú waterfalls, no shortage of water here either.
The first flash of insight, when LB first mentioned Argentina, was the northern regions of it being the only safe places. The southern and western parts being, if it's not yet, it will be, susceptible to floods. I believe somewhere here LB also mentioned knowing someone in the northern section of S. America.

And now that you mentioned S. America. A cousin and his wife invited me to Central America. Before they both go back to earn their chosen specilized medical field of study, he wants to explore C. America. I asked him where he had mind. My thought,"I wonder if its the Yucatan". Well, it IS, and the first place he wants to visit. I can hardly wait to see/hear what messages I'll gather. And as it's been said before things happen for a reason. I am also hoping I come back with some tools.
and I don't mean mechanical tools; even though that would be a wonderful find.
cointreau wrote:I am very glad to communicate with all of you again, Let me know what you think and if you are still thinking about this project since the last posting was over a year ago.

I must say it's an interesting thought. Thanks for the links, inspiring views.


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Re: South América

Post by LoneBear » Sat Mar 31, 2007 12:22 pm

cointreau wrote:Hello There, long time no see! How are you all doing?
I was just talking about you a few days ago, and was wondering where you got to. And now, you're here. Perhaps it's a "sign" that you went back to Venezuela.
cointreau wrote:I see that LB is entertaining the possibility of starting an intentional community in S.A. and would like to offer my help since I am the only one already there (and won't have to buy the latest edition of Spanish for Dummies in order to get around). I've heard of similar projects already in existence in an area of the Venezuelan Amazon called Canaima, the place that was the inspiration for the book "The lost world" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. This is also a hot spot for UFO sightings which is one of the many reasons for such communities to exist around that area.
My inspiration has always been from two sources: "Utopia", by Sir Thomas More, and "Lost Horizon" by James Hilton.

Regarding UFOs... need to be careful there. These days, most of the "vehicle" sightings are the NWO craft or Orion ships. If they are around frequently, then you can bet there is a not-so-nice base somewhere nearby.
cointreau wrote:Home to the oldest geologic formations on Earth, this particular region is on top of what is known to geologists as the Guyana shield which is one of the most stable regions of the world (no eathquakes), there are no hurricanes or floods either although there is a very intense rainy season . There is water everywhere and plenty of food. It is a truly magical place.
I'll check that out in detail. Though one of the problems with shields is that they are the first choice for people to run to when there is a problem.
cointreau wrote:I also read L.B mentioning Argentina which is a good place as well, however, due to its latitude, only the northern part of the country, the province of Misiones, would be desirable for such project, otherwise snow and extreme temperatures come into the equation. My best friend happens to be from that region and has spoken to me extensively about it, it is also a beautiful and magical place highlighted by the iguazú waterfalls, no shortage of water here either
I've been planning a trip to SA, and Iguazú falls was one of the regions I wanted to look at.

But consider... conditions might be extreme in other places... NOW... but the environment is changing; the Earth and Sun are heating up. The safe or comfortable place may not be the right place. There are a LOT of factors that go into it. I'd be more than happy to put up with temperature extremes, if I had access to one of the Cyclopean cities nearby.
cointreau wrote:I am very glad to communicate with all of you again, Let me know what you think and if you are still thinking about this project since the last posting was over a year ago.
I've been doing background research on location and taking a hard look at what kind of manpower would be needed, and if any groups would be interested. We located a group of Elders out in India, that we are trying to set up a dialog with through Gopi. Also ran across two other groups that are interested in working together. Met with one; the other is in Peru so a bit more difficult. Time will tell if things will work.

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Re: South América

Post by LoneBear » Tue Apr 10, 2007 6:15 pm

cointreau wrote:Home to the oldest geologic formations on Earth, this particular region is on top of what is known to geologists as the Guyana shield which is one of the most stable regions of the world (no eathquakes)
When it comes to living in earthquake regions, I think Swami Beyondananda has the best advice: "When you find a fault, don't dwell on it."

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Post by LoneBear » Thu Jun 14, 2007 12:58 pm

A friend of mine whom used to live in Brasil (and now lives in Canada) suggests that Venezuela may not be a good place to live shortly. Chavez's oil policies have put him right in the sight of the big oil guns, which means if the US cannot get political control of Venezuela through "democracy", then the next invasion might be there...

THE END OF OIL SECURITY
by Martin Hutchinson

By seizing control of the Orinoco tar sands, Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez delivered a stunning blow to US oil security. If the world economy worked in the way postulated by the globalizers his action would hardly have mattered, except to the unfortunate shareholders of the affected oil companies. However, the world economy doesn't work that way, and Chavez's seizure is thus of major long-term importance.

Orinoco is important, not because of current production from the region, a modest 600,000 barrels per day at a cost of $20 per barrel, economic but well in excess of the cost of Saudi or even Mexican offshore oil, but because of the size of the tar sands deposit. This has been variously estimated at between 1.2 trillion and 1.8 trillion barrels of oil, with higher estimates more recently. At the latter figure Orinoco represents 34% of all known world oil reserves, and 58 years of world oil consumption at current levels.

Since Orinoco's oil comes in the form of tar sands, extracting petroleum is expensive, and not all the theoretically available petroleum can be extracted. However, current estimates that only around one fifth of these sands can be economically used are probably over-pessimistic; we have only been extracting oil commercially from the Orinoco tar sands and the similar Athabasca tar sands in Canada for less than a decade, so extraction technology can be expected to improve. Over the next couple of decades, production from Orinoco could be ramped up and extraction technology improved, so that the sands could take their rightful place among the world's truly important sources of energy supply.

Thus if Orinoco and Athabasca were freely available to the world market the extreme "peak oil" theorizers would be wrong; there is enough oil supply for the world's needs for at least 100 years at current prices. Only a sharp ramp-up in world oil usage or a disruption in the free trade patterns of world oil could prevent the United States and other major world oil users from having enough supply well past 2100. Whether burning all that oil would disrupt the world's climate is another question (my estimate is: only modestly, provided appropriate precautions were taken) but oil supply as such should not be a problem.

Before Chavez's action, a free world oil market seemed a reasonable assumption. There were certain rigidities, such as the US refusal to deal with Iran, but Iran is a second tier supplier and there are plenty of other countries willing to deal with it (as there were with Iraq in the days of the infamous "oil for food" program.) The main problem has been the extraordinarily rapid surge in Chinese and to a lesser extent Indian oil demand, which disrupted established market relationships and was bound to strain the system as well as raising oil prices.

In a well ordered market, other participants would have met with China and held open discussions of China's future needs and the potential sources to satisfy Chinese demand. This would have ensured that China was reassured about the openness of world oil markets to Chinese participation, and might well have led China itself to play by the rules in a value-maximizing way. One way of convincing China that the world market was truly open to it, for example, would have been to allow the Chinese National Oil Company to buy Union Oil of California in 2005, a substantial but strictly second-tier transaction that threatened nobody.

This didn't happen. Instead the Chinese leadership, having been brought up outside the free market system, naturally don't expect to play by its rules. Having seen political pressure brought to bear in the US Congress to prevent them buying an oil source on the free market, China has determined to deal primarily with the "bad guys" who violate human rights or are otherwise motivated by hatred of the US and the existing world order. Since in turn Chinese checkbooks have removed any incentive to good behavior for human rights violators with natural resource deposits, human rights abuses have increased, as has anti-Americanism.

However, until now China's actions weren't particularly important. Sudan is not a major player in the world's oil markets, while Iran is only a middle tier player and has other potential buyers in Europe. Human rights may thus suffer because of China's oil purchases, and US foreign policy has taken a major hit, but the oil market itself has not been significantly affected. Even China's deal last September to take 500,000 barrels per day from Venezuela, although economically insane because Venezuela has a much closer market in the US, was for a modest amount of oil and could not reasonably have been said to be market-disruptive.

The combination of Chavez's visceral anti-Americanism with Chinese paranoia, when applied to the Orinoco oil sands is uniquely damaging to the stability of the world's oil market; it is a marriage truly made in the nether regions as far as the United States is concerned.

If Chavez did not have access to non-US technology, even the simplest of embargoes would prevent him from exploiting Orinoco beyond its current state of development. The natural inefficiency of the state-run petroleum combine Petroleos de Venezuela would cause oil output to decline, particularly in the technologically complex Orinoco projects, while attempts to divert sales away from the United States would reduce Venezuela's oil revenues. Chavez would run out of money fairly rapidly, and in the next oil price downturn would either be deposed or would return to the United States, cap in hand like Libya's Muammar Qaddafi. Either way, disruption to the world oil market and to US energy security would be minor and short-lived.

With Chinese help, however, Chavez is in a very different position. Chinese technology is probably not currently state-of-the-art in its ability to extract oil from sands. However China's ability to backward-engineer technology and the resources it has available to devote to the problem would, with the US facilities already in place, quickly bring a Chinese "technical assistance" crew up to speed. At that point, there would be no further need for Chavez ever to sell another barrel of oil to the United States; he could simply ship Venezuela's entire output to China.

Again, if the world oil market were truly free in the Adam Smith sense, this would not matter. If China bought its oil from Venezuela, and used its technological abilities to ramp up Venezuelan output, the United States could simply divert its purchases to other sellers. However, in a tight oil market this runs into a problem: in the long term, the major oil suppliers outside Orinoco, Athabasca and Russia are all in the Middle East. As it has shown in the gas market and again with its attempted suspension of deliveries to Estonia, the Russia of Vladimir Putin is a fairly unreliable supplier. In any case Russian oil production is beginning to decline, and is unlikely to be increased sharply while the country is mired in its current corruption.

Thus instead of China being forced to rely on unpleasant and unreliable Sudanese and Iranians for the additional oil it needs, the US consumer will now be subject to the tender mercies of the three major Middle Eastern oil producers, Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Iran. While the US has troops in Iraq, there probably isn't a problem; Iraq is now believed to have oil reserves of 200 billion barrels, little more than a tenth of Orinoco but still enough to be ramped up to supplement other sources. If and when the US withdraws from Iraq, and that country either collapses into civil war or aligns itself with US-hostile Iran, the US suddenly has a frighteningly large number of economic chips placed on the fragile political stability of Saudi Arabia.

Absent a major world recession, this is a problem that is only going to get worse. The United States currently imports 58% of its oil needs; that percentage is forecast to rise to 68% by 2020. Athabasca will supply some of the excess, but environmental considerations and the difficulty and cost of extraction mean that Athabasca may not be able to be ramped up as quickly as the US would wish - the US Energy Department's 2006 International Energy Outlook has Athabasca production at only 2.8 million barrels/day in 2030, less than 10% of US consumption in that year. China's consumption, on the other hand, is expected to have quadrupled by 2030, with the country importing 11 million barrels/day.

If Venezuela were democratic, the United States would not need to worry - Chavez would be out of office at the latest by 2015 or so, as even the impoverished Venezuelan masses wouldn't elect him indefinitely. If he didn't have China to help him, an undemocratic but economically incompetent Chavez would also undoubtedly fall from power well before then. However, as Chavez moves towards dictatorship his potential longevity increases - Fidel Castro, after all, has been in office 48 years and counting. In 2030 Chavez will still be only 76, five years younger than Castro is today and with Chinese-derived oil revenues he is very likely to be still in power. The United States, desperate for oil imports, may well by that year be begging Vladimir Putin's thuggish successors and the revolutionary regime that replaced Saudi Arabia's monarchy for oil market mercy.

The Iraq war was not about oil. It didn't need to be; the world oil market under the control of the United States, Japan and the EU was more or less free, so that a hostile Iraqi regime could easily be countered by a partial oil embargo and purchases elsewhere. The next war in which the United States is involved may well be about oil, however, and if the United States seeks to preserve its essential interests by assaulting the largest source of supply, with the most irredeemably hostile regime, Islam will have nothing whatever to do with it.

Regards,
Martin Hutchinson

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Post by cointreau » Sun Nov 25, 2007 10:08 pm

I respect your opinions about Venezuela and understand that the political climate might not be the best to develop a place like the one in mind (even though I am enjoying my stay here tremendously), there are other options though, Chile is the most stable country in South America and Costa Rica would be a good option too if it wasn't for its position in the middle of a seismic zone (Chile too) plus the numerous dormant volcanoes. We had discussed already that northern Argentina in the province of Misiones (close to the Iguazú waterfalls) was a good place. If you are up to coming South of the border we can travel together and explore this possibilities. One of my good friends is from Misiones he'll be more than happy to get us acquanted with the locals. My mother lives in Costa Rica so that is easy. Let me know what you think!

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Post by LoneBear » Mon Nov 26, 2007 1:09 pm

cointreau wrote:We had discussed already that northern Argentina in the province of Misiones (close to the Iguazú waterfalls) was a good place.
I am interested in visiting this area. The maps I have of the ancient tunnel system indicate that the area may contain one of the El cities, as well as an entrance to Agharta, which may also be an Ancient city (interesting discussion here; Gopi and I have come up with an unusual 'take' on the ancient city reference, linked with the Hunt-Williamson work, the Vedas and the Norse Eddas).

Are you familiar with any of the local mythos of that region?
cointreau wrote:If you are up to coming South of the border we can travel together and explore this possibilities. One of my good friends is from Misiones he'll be more than happy to get us acquanted with the locals. My mother lives in Costa Rica so that is easy. Let me know what you think!
I'll take you up on that offer. Gopi, BlueEagle and I were talking about setting up a trip down that way for next summer, when they are out of school. I don't know if anyone else would be interested, but if enough people were, we could get "group rates" and do a nice excursion to the sacred and ancient sites in a number of countries. I, for one, am really interested in poking around some of the old ruins, looking for remnants of the Elder race.

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Post by lvx08 » Mon Nov 26, 2007 8:30 pm

LoneBear wrote: I'll take you up on that offer. Gopi, BlueEagle and I were talking about setting up a trip down that way for next summer, when they are out of school. I don't know if anyone else would be interested, but if enough people were, we could get "group rates" and do a nice excursion to the sacred and ancient sites in a number of countries. I, for one, am really interested in poking around some of the old ruins, looking for remnants of the Elder race.
Yes I'd be interested. I've wanted to see Sth America particularly Peru for some time but the right circumstance has never emerged. I better start learning some spanish.

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Post by Gopi » Mon Nov 26, 2007 11:37 pm

LoneBear wrote: Are you familiar with any of the local mythos of that region?
Yup, that's an important point, which is probably a better guide for the places we ought to be looking into. Friendly locals are the best resource anyone can have, and frequently the way things 'open up'.

The 'signs' are right, I am getting crazy synchronicity with regard to this. All I need is a route to get it done... are there any good Universities for physical sciences in Argentina? I know what the net tells me but a word of mouth account is more reliable in these cases...

Cheerio

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It is time.

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Post by LoneBear » Thu Nov 29, 2007 2:31 am

lvx08 wrote:Yes I'd be interested. I've wanted to see Sth America particularly Peru for some time but the right circumstance has never emerged. I better start learning some spanish.
Glad to have you along. I would love to go hiking around Machu Piccu... looks to be an incredible place.

Been doing some travel research, and finding out that many of these sacred site places have become "tourist rip-off zones", where ludicrous prices are being demanded for basic services, particularly if you are American. Charging $80 for a $2 train fare, very high guide prices, etc. Going to have to look in to it some more.

My desire is not to follow the beaten path. Granted, the major attractions are interesting, but it's a BIG continent, with lots of mysteries.

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Post by Alluvion » Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:59 pm

and of course, on the backside of the card of mystery is danger - but it wouldn't be an adventure without the proximity both.

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Post by cointreau » Sat Dec 01, 2007 4:56 pm

LoneBear wrote: Are you familiar with any of the local mythos of that region?
I did a little research on the topic and found surprisingly enough references to something similar to big foot and also veneration ceremonies to Pachamama or mather earth where they inter food and other gifts into the ground.http://historiasdesdelaraiz.blogspot.co ... eblos.html

The coolest information I found came from the local tribe the Guaraníes (Mbyá Güraní) and is an explanation of the creation of the Garganta del diablo (Devi'ls throat) whic is one of most impressive features of the Iguazú Falls (See attachment)

The story tells of an evil traveler (Añá) tired of spreading his misfortunes for millenia who stopped to rest by the waters of Iguazú. When he placed his head on the ground it was scorched. The river in a maternal gesture covered with water the body engulfed in flames but Aña did not play attention. tempted to drink the water Aña opened his mouth and the Iguazú river upset by the disdain "let loose its liquid fury". So the body of Añú was trapped forever marking the spot of the triumph of water over fire. The story goes on to tell that the Guaraníes chose this part of the world after travelling all over and decided to name it Yvymaraey or land without evil since the evil had been defeated in the battle. http://historiasdesdelaraiz.blogspot.co ... -gran.html

Interesting!!! maybe a meteor?

Now if you really want to study the Guaraní in detail take a look at their cosmogeny straight from the source:

http://historiasdesdelaraiz.blogspot.co ... a-mby.html
(sorry guys it's all in Spanish)

but you can use one of those on line translators and you'll get the idea. I can't translate verbatum the whole thing but they pretty much agree with the concepts of creation known to us where a creator contemplates itself and irradiates life. The second stage according to them is "Spoken word" how about that? Then the creation of the four Gods in control of the four elements (Pretty accurate stuff) then the first earth is created along with humans and animals but this earth perishes due to "man's imperfect actions" and a new earth is created (not so perfect) where man has lost its divine condition and must accept its new mortal state. The story closes with them finding the Iguazú falls which is the land without evil where they can find again the secrets to their lost inmortality!!!!
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Post by cointreau » Sat Dec 01, 2007 5:10 pm

LoneBear wrote:Been doing some travel research, and finding out that many of these sacred site places have become "tourist rip-off zones", where ludicrous prices are being demanded for basic services, particularly if you are American. Charging $80 for a $2 train fare, very high guide prices, etc. Going to have to look in to it some more.
Don't worry about that, I already have that one figured out, I have done it before. You guys hide and I do all the negotiation. They always pump up the prices when they see gringos or other non-Spanish speaking Europeans tourists. Once I've negociated the price you come out of your hiding place and then you can see their upset faces (it's pretty cool watching them get pissed over not being able to rip off the tourist!!!)

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Re: Venezuela

Post by Gopi » Fri Jun 06, 2008 8:52 am

Hey Cointreau! What news from Venezuela?
It is time.

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Re: Venezuela

Post by cointreau » Fri Jun 06, 2008 9:21 am

Hello Gopi, thanks for asking. Venezuela is a wonderful country and I feel extremely confortable living here since I am a native, However, as of July I will be going to Colorado since I was offered a position as a teacher over there. I just finished writing an email to BlueEagle and Lone Bear requesting a little help with the transition. after writing the message I went on to check posts and saw yours!!! Obviously not a coincidence.

How's everything in your part of the world? by the way I will be needing a car pretty bad as soon as I get to the States, please send me one of those 2.000 dollars car from over there!!!

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Re: Venezuela

Post by LoneBear » Thu Aug 28, 2008 5:29 pm

The locations in Venezuela that Cointreau has shown me as sites for Sanctuary were all in the southwest region, in the Andes Mountains. I found this quote to be somewhat synchronistic, considering I was born in 1957 and have been getting a strong pull to South America most of my life:

[quote]In July 1957, Beloved Master El Morya said:


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Re: Venezuela

Post by cointreau » Thu Aug 28, 2008 6:25 pm

That is a very interesting quote, I did not know El Morya had made comments about the Andes. Did you stumble upon this quote randomly or were you consciously looking for information on the Andes?

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Re: Venezuela

Post by LoneBear » Thu Aug 28, 2008 6:30 pm

cointreau wrote:That is a very interesting quote, I did not know El Morya had made comments about the Andes. Did you stumble upon this quote randomly or were you consciously looking for information on the Andes?
It was random; I was looking for information on the Orion home world, and part of the search for "El" turned up "El Morya" on the Antiquatis library. I posted it because it felt like one of those "not an accident" things.

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Re: Venezuela

Post by cointreau » Fri Sep 12, 2008 6:17 pm

Very interesting news are developing in Venezuela right now. Yesterday (September 11) the US announced they were going to kick out the ambassador from Bolivia out of the U.S. and it is obvious president Chavez didn't like the move one bit. Yesterday on national TV talking to a big crowd Chavez announced he had decided to do the same with the US ambassador in Venezuela.



Here is a wider picture on what is going on (Russian airplanes in Venezuela, this has never happened before) :

[youtube]d-n572FPEqg&NR=1[/youtube]



This is getting very exciting!!!!
Last edited by cointreau on Fri Sep 12, 2008 7:16 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Venezuela

Post by cointreau » Fri Sep 12, 2008 6:47 pm

It is still amazing to me why this is not the candidate for the Republican party:



This guy is pretty clear!!!

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Re: Venezuela

Post by Alluvion » Sat Sep 13, 2008 8:30 am

"...opposed the war in Iraq." There you go Cointeau, he didn't follow suit.

Its funny to me that you say the Russian military in Venezuela is exciting - I don't find the thought of war with either and/or BOTH Russian and Venezuela exciting in the least.

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Re: Venezuela

Post by Arcelius » Sat Sep 13, 2008 12:21 pm

Alluvion wrote:Its funny to me that you say the Russian military in Venezuela is exciting - I don't find the thought of war with either and/or BOTH Russian and Venezuela exciting in the least.
I wouldn't find war to be exciting regardless of who is fighting it. However, with Russian backing, the US will certainly think more than twice about attacking Venezuela. It could also mean that Hugo Chavez is not alone in opposing current US foreign policy which can be exciting.

Thanks Cointreau for sharing!

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Re: Venezuela

Post by cointreau » Sun Sep 14, 2008 5:26 pm

The word exciting to me does not have any positive or negative connotations.

Exciting to me is something that excites, something that changes or alters the normal state of something (no judgment attached) . Please be aware that English is my third language and as a result, I am conscientious of the fact that sometimes I might make poor word choices, specially if the words are Latin based (since I tend to transfer into English the meaning of the word that I already know).

I did check in the Merriam Webster dictionary to see if I had used the word incorrectly; However, I could not find anything indicating that the use of the word "exciting" is exclusively linked to positive emotions.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/excite

This is not the first time this hapens to me. Another clear example is the the word Terrific (of Latin origin), which is currently used in English to describe something extraordinary or magnificent, while in Spanish, "Terrifico" means something that is bad or frightening. Now, if you take a closer look at the definition of the word, you will find that entry # 1 in the dictionary is: very bad, or frightful. This meaning has obviously fallen in disuse in the Anglo world. Worthy of mentioning also, is how the word "exciting" is used to illustrate the point:

Terrific: 1 a: very bad : frightful b: exciting or fit to excite fear or awe <a terrific thunderstorm>

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Terrific

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Re: Venezuela

Post by Alluvion » Sun Sep 14, 2008 5:45 pm

true! a cultural appropriation revealed! thanks cointreau!
Last edited by Alluvion on Sun Sep 14, 2008 7:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Venezuela

Post by cointreau » Sun Sep 14, 2008 5:53 pm

you are very welcomed, my friend!

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