Mandela Effect

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LoneBear
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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by LoneBear » Sat May 14, 2016 4:08 pm

joeyv23 wrote:The only personal accounts I have with this thing is with the spelling of Berenstein [1][2]
Berenstain Pronunciation: Bear en steen
http://www.pronouncenames.com/pronounce/berenstain

Odds are that you phonetically spelled it in your mind, incorrectly. Just look around the net for Berenstein Bear merchandise, which says Berenstain on the actual merchandise.

So, is it Godzilla (god-zilla) or Gojira (go-jeer-a)? If a Japanese person says Gojira, we hear Godzilla. (Brought up in the American version of Godzilla).

If an American sees the name, "Torquay," we hear "tore qway" in our mind. Until a Brit comes along and pronounces it as Tall-Key. (Fawlty Towers). It is actually pronounced "Tore Key." ("R" and "L" are often confused as phonemes.)

If your mind is not trained to recognize the phonemes being spoken, it will make the nearest substitution to a recognizable one. "Stain" becomes a stain on the rug, not a "steen."
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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by joeyv23 » Sat May 14, 2016 11:10 pm

LoneBear wrote:
joeyv23 wrote:The only personal accounts I have with this thing is with the spelling of Berenstein [1][2]
Berenstain Pronunciation: Bear en steen
http://www.pronouncenames.com/pronounce/berenstain

Odds are that you phonetically spelled it in your mind, incorrectly. Just look around the net for Berenstein Bear merchandise, which says Berenstain on the actual merchandise.

So, is it Godzilla (god-zilla) or Gojira (go-jeer-a)? If a Japanese person says Gojira, we hear Godzilla. (Brought up in the American version of Godzilla).

If an American sees the name, "Torquay," we hear "tore qway" in our mind. Until a Brit comes along and pronounces it as Tall-Key. (Fawlty Towers). It is actually pronounced "Tore Key." ("R" and "L" are often confused as phonemes.)

If your mind is not trained to recognize the phonemes being spoken, it will make the nearest substitution to a recognizable one. "Stain" becomes a stain on the rug, not a "steen."
I plead no contest. I merely find it interesting that somewhere along the lines, my mind created a connection with the name to German beer mugs. That's the only reason I brought it up a couple of years ago. I can't say that it isn't a posthumous correlation, but I found the linkage from bear to beer because stein has an obvious connection to both, interesting.
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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by Ilkka » Sun May 15, 2016 1:08 am

joeyv23 wrote:On Mauritania, I don't recall that country in Africa at all. Sometime in middle school we had to label all of the countries of the world and for the life of me, I don't remember labeling a country west of Mali as Mauritania.
I dont remember that also, since it was very slightly mentioned back then, however just checked my globe that was made in 1995 there is Mauritania right where it supposed to be.

Have you guys seen any news about Mongolia? It is like it also doesnt exist since nothing in the news about it. At least the western media doesn't do news about it unless some earthquake hits it hard enough.
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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by LoneBear » Sun May 15, 2016 12:36 pm

joeyv23 wrote:I merely find it interesting that somewhere along the lines, my mind created a connection with the name to German beer mugs. That's the only reason I brought it up a couple of years ago. I can't say that it isn't a posthumous correlation, but I found the linkage from bear to beer because stein has an obvious connection to both, interesting.
"Complexity is entertaining, simplicity is not." --Dewey Larson

Now that you mention it, it does seem that modern minds are desperate for neural connectivity, probably as a natural consequence of offloading thinking and memory to Google and the Cloud, and the excessive use of neural blockers (recreational drugs). It may also explain why people get bored so easily nowadays--when a person's thoughts have no recourse but what is in their own mind to entertain them, it is like they are standing in an empty room. As the old saying goes, "the lights are on, but nobody is home."

Given that consciousness desires to evolve, it needs the tools to do so--and those tools need to be accessible to consciousness through the mind and brain, the yin-yang of intelligence. The absence of knowledge and neural connectivity will create a strong desire to obtain it--and will accept, without question, whatever it can get. (That may explain things like Flat Earth popularity.)

I grew up with computers, yet it never occurred to me that it might be possible for psychological projection and transference to occur between man and AI... in the past, it was always limited to living systems. I can definitely see Kurzweil's dream coming into fruition.
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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by animus » Sun May 15, 2016 12:41 pm

LoneBear wrote:Much of this was documented in the Stargate SG-1 episode, "Revisions" (Season 7), where the inhabitants brains became part of the "cloud" and the AI running the dome could simply adjust everyone's memory as needed.

Sci-Fi tends to be predictive, so that is where things are probably heading.
Indeed. Compare the gadget from Stargate with an equivalent of today:

Image
Image

Not far off, are we?
How about this one:

Image


Lest we forget, everything is backwards:
Life without Google Glass is a cold, lonely way to live. At least that is the way Marc Andreessen, co-founder of Andreessen Horowitz, describes the way people may eventually feel when they aren't wearing the device. (source)
Funny, how the only lonely guy in the picture (Sergey Brin) is the one promoting said device.

Image


In this context, here's a question with a possible answer:
daniel wrote:Humm... I think Ilkka may have answered a question that has puzzled me for a while--why the NWO is pushing technology so hard on the population. In my view, smartphones can provide almost instant access to any information on the globe. Knowledge is power, and power is danger to the NWO. So why do it? (source)
hoi.polloi wrote:According to a 1989 interview with Mitre trustee Doctor Ruina, he does not “recall” a great many details about how the military program actually started, how it was funded, or what purposes the military had for developing the Internet; except as, perhaps, a ballistic missile defense program. His emphasis and re-emphasis on the uselessness of behavioral science and computer combinations fail to even suggest that DARPA might become a sort of constant, general source of inspiration for all the ways in which imaginative human contributions to the Internet could be absorbed into the war hierarchy. Why would a Mitre spook be so wordily “defensive” about the subject of the very beginning of computer technology or its connections to Rockefeller-funded social study groups? Is it because the Internet was specifically created for the purpose of studying the potential for monitoring and controlling human behavior? (source)

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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by Juanter » Thu May 19, 2016 12:53 pm

Changing reality is not connected to individual memory--memory has to be changed, first, to alter reality. Those that don't participate in collective memory are the people remember things differently--they are using magick not to change the past, but to alter the present.
I agree, this is where my head is on the subject as well.
On Mauritania, I don't recall that country in Africa at all. Sometime in middle school we had to label all of the countries of the world and for the life of me, I don't remember labeling a country west of Mali as Mauritania.
Your not alone on that one.
I don't remember that also, since it was very slightly mentioned back then, however just checked my globe that was made in 1995 there is Mauritania right where it supposed to be.
Yes, that is the very disturbing thing about this trend.....Even the old maps your grandparents have at their house now have Mauritania as a Country. The reality has changed. It isn't that all the places on the web you look have changed (which can be attributed to some sort of changing the evidence people view.) Rather the maps that were printed in the 70's now show this new reality. And the ONLY evidence you have is your ABSOLUTE memory. So in a very real way, as Daniel indicated, we are being forced/required to question our own ABSOLUTE memories. Ourselves versus "reality."

[quoteI've been looking at some of the sites regarding the Mandela effect and from what I've read, most of it seems to be a New Age "excuse" for increasingly poor education and personal memory.][/quote]

I agree with you in that many of the reported Mandela Effects can simply be attributed to poor memory. (I.E 52 states, Mongolia being part of China, Chic-fil-a, Sex and the City, etc.) But not the major ones to me. I watched Billy Grahams funeral and I know what maps used to look like. Just with any other issue attempts will be made to disprove the worst arguments in order to infer that the good arguments are also false. (See Strawman argument.)

On a strange side note my wife and I began talking about reality and whether or not we were creating our own reality as we go. So we decided perform an experiment. We decided to think up some new island on earth, meditate on it, go to sleep and then see if it existed the next day when we woke up. We brainstormed on such a place and come up with the following criteria for our new "island" it included the following:
1. It is an island
2. It is near Madagascar
3. it is inhabited by albinos (I put this in to attempt to confirm that we created it, seeing as it would be an odd thing)
4. Near a volcano
5. The name of the Island would be Ekko.

So I meditated on it and then went to bed. Got up the next day and Googled, "Albino Island." Here is what popped up:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukerewe_Island

Yup, that's right. An island in Lake Victoria (very near Madagascar) inhabited by a large amount of albinos, just a few miles away from the largest volcano in Africa (Nyamuragira), and the name of the Island...................Ukerewe. Now that is just amazing to me. All things spot on but the name. However, the name Ukerewe is very damn close phonetically to how I was pronouncing Ekko when I was in meditation. Like the word got muffled when traveling to the "creation space." Regadless very close.

So yeah there are potential explanations for this, (i.e. I subconsciously remembered this place and somehow I regurgitated its specifics and name when brainstorming) but man, I don't think so. However if true, and we are creating our reality their are some ethical considerations that must be followed. Because if I did crete this then I also created a island of albinos that have been tortured and persecuted for hundreds of years, thus creating their inhabitation of said island.

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Mauritania

Post by LoneBear » Thu May 19, 2016 1:58 pm

Interesting... in Compton's Pictured Encyclopedia and Fact-Index, Volume 1, 1946, the region shown as Mauritania on Wikipedia was called "French West Africa." Mauritania is on the map as a territory, along with French Sudan, Niger and Algeria. Earlier maps just show the region from Mauritania to Libya as one big desert labeled, "Sahara."

It seems that the political competition to claim Africa by the Europeans caused quite a few name changes, so depending on who wrote the references that were read, the country may have been labeled differently.
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Re: Mauritania

Post by joeyv23 » Thu May 19, 2016 3:18 pm

LoneBear wrote:Interesting... in Compton's Pictured Encyclopedia and Fact-Index, Volume 1, 1946, the region shown as Mauritania on Wikipedia was called "French West Africa." Mauritania is on the map as a territory, along with French Sudan, Niger and Algeria. Earlier maps just show the region from Mauritania to Libya as one big desert labeled, "Sahara."

It seems that the political competition to claim Africa by the Europeans caused quite a few name changes, so depending on who wrote the references that were read, the country may have been labeled differently.
I find this to be a very logical explanation, as I do recall French West Africa, and when looking into Mauritania, it occurred to me that what you've detailed here might be the case.
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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by Ilkka » Fri May 20, 2016 12:30 pm

They like to change names for sure. My home town "Nokia" was once called "Pohjois-Pirkkala"(pohjois = northern) in 1927 and in 1938 it took the name of Nokia.

Just a few/several years ago they changed another neighboring towns name from "Vammala" to "Sastamala". It is interesting since "vamma" translates to injury, handicap etc. and "sastamala" is referring to filth/impurity. There are however more worse names for towns and villages in this country :lol:
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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by LoneBear » Mon Jun 27, 2016 11:52 am

The Mandela Effect came up again during last Saturday's "Science Night," so I ended up doing some more research.

The one I find the most interesting is from Snow White, where the wicked Queen talks to the magic mirror on the wall, which virtually everyone remembers as "Mirror, mirror on the wall, who is the fairest one of all." I had a collection of Disney videotapes that I digitized years ago, so I checked... what she says is, "Magic mirror on the wall..."

While watching it, I became aware of something else... I did not have much of a visual memory record of anything in that film, except for Snow White and a couple of the dwarves (Doc and Dopey). Nor did I remember any other quotes from the film. Of course, I probably saw it back in the 1960s, so pretty deep in long-term memory now.

IMHO, I do not believe the quote changed--it was always, "Magic mirror on the wall," but the misquote of "mirror, mirror" became far more prominent than the actual words on the film. The more something is repeated, the more it gets ingrained in the memory. One time for "magic mirror" and several thousand for "mirror, mirror" -- the former gets forgotten and replaced by the latter. That is how memory works. (Search the net for "mirror, mirror" and compare to the hits for "magic mirror.")

I do not doubt there is something unusual going on, but it isn't a "parallel timeline" or anything like that--it appears to be linguistic reprogramming. In virtually every case I've looked at, there is phonetic corruption--internal sound recording replaces the visual symbols. "Berenstain Bears" is actually pronounced "bear-n-stein" which then gets phonemes memorized as "Bearenstein." See the thread on Artificial Intelligence, which describes how our mind recognizes and memorized speech patterns--unless you have eidetic memory, you store words by phonemes--not by visual symbols.

Star Wars "No. I am your father" did throw me for a bit, but I happen to have the 1980 paperback and when you read the text, "No" makes more sense, because it is in response to Luke's answer to "Obiwan never told you what happened to your father." And the word, "no," is not clearly heard in the film, so the mind could easily substitute the reference "Luke," since the comment was directed at Luke.

I've noticed that in all these claims--just like the "Flat Earth" stuff--context is missing--you only get the quote, nothing before or after to frame memory recall.

The "Nobody doesn't like Sarah Lee" catch phrase is what I remember from childhood--though the claim is that it was, "Nobody does it like Sarah Lee." But I remember the jingle... "Everybody doesn't like something, but nobody doesn't like Sarah Lee," repeated over and over and over. That is logical marketing, whereas "does it like" is not, because you are establishing a conditioning pattern with negation. You don't want to switch to the positive, because it would break the pattern.



My conclusion, thus far, is that the external reality is NOT changing--but minds are being reprogrammed by auditory reconditioning (sounds, voice and music) and the Mandela Effect is one of those "beta test" systems to see how effective it actually is.
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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by pgolde » Mon Jun 27, 2016 8:54 pm

I specifically remember the Sara Lee jingle because Sister Claire Marie my 3rd grade teacher was explaining the double negative, Nobody Doesn't Like.
I wondered why she would bother to explain this to a bunch of third graders.

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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by Andrew » Tue Dec 27, 2016 6:30 pm

My conclusion, thus far, is that the external reality is NOT changing--but minds are being reprogrammed by auditory reconditioning (sounds, voice and music) and the Mandela Effect is one of those "beta test" systems to see how effective it actually is.
In the case of Shannon Doherty vs Shannen Doherty, you have two first names that are pronounced the exact same, but the people that swear her name was Shannon could have been seeing the only recognition they had of how it was pronounced and spelled.

LB, you're familiar with Charmed. What did you see before the "ME" kicked in?
"Classical historians traditionally dismiss tales of magic as unworthy of scholarly attention, but to us any mention of a witch's broomstick or wizard's wand evokes the smell of a scientist's laboratory." The Sphinx and the Megaliths

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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by LoneBear » Wed Dec 28, 2016 10:27 am

Andrew wrote:LB, you're familiar with Charmed. What did you see before the "ME" kicked in?
I always saw her name as Shannen. Charmed is the only TV show I've seen that she starred in and I have not run around the Internet looking for stories about her, so that is the only way I've ever seen it spelled.
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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by Arcelius » Wed Dec 28, 2016 9:14 pm

LoneBear wrote:IMHO, I do not believe the quote changed--it was always, "Magic mirror on the wall," but the misquote of "mirror, mirror" became far more prominent than the actual words on the film.
Brothers Grimm Fairy Tales wrote:Spieglein, Spieglein an der Wand, wer ist die Schönste im ganzen Land?
The original Grimm brothers story says "mirror, mirror" and since their version is 100+ years older than the Disney one, I think that is where the confusion originates. While it is a misquote from the film, it is not a misquote from the "original" story.

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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by Juanter » Wed Jan 18, 2017 11:57 pm

I have been thinking about this for months and in the end I think I quasi agree with bear. Ma isn't so much a bleeding of universes rather some breakthrough of "reality" through "programming" consciousness attempting to right its self. The effect is youself trying to say "wake up fool!"

Missed you folks. Hope to meet you soon I have certainly been on a quest of sorts recently.

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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by Gopi » Wed Jun 21, 2017 10:09 am

I think it is one of those times Miles got it right:

http://mileswmathis.com/mandela.pdf
It is time.

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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by DSKlausler » Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:31 am

Gopi wrote:
Wed Jun 21, 2017 10:09 am
I think it is one of those times Miles got it right:

http://mileswmathis.com/mandela.pdf
Agreed.
Anything is possible with the proper training.

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Re: Mandela Effect

Post by kano » Fri Jun 30, 2017 1:00 pm

The best example of the Mandela Effect that I cannot reconcile is the character Dolly not having braces in the James Bond movie "Moonraker." I remember her absolutely having braces. Now she does not. Does anyone else remember this?

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