Developing Community

Discussion of the basic concepts and philosophy behind the idea of a Sanctuary; a place where those exhibiting traits of the next generation of man can meet and learn, without prejudice or bias.
Spaceman
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Re: Developing Community

Post by Spaceman » Mon Jul 17, 2017 7:18 pm

kano wrote:
Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:21 pm
I see. What do you estimate the initial start up costs to be? In the existing owner scenario and the ground up scenario? Also, what topography is ideal for the Monastery? Year round warmth, flowing water, flat, forest vs field, etc?
The initial start up costs could vary quite a bit in both situations, but essentially the difference is that in the existing owner scenario we are talking multiple thousands of dollars, and if we are talking ground up we would need to be dealing with multiple millions of dollars. Just to reiterate what Joey has indicated, the property we are looking at now is not intended to become the Monastery proper. Heartwater Farm is only intended to get the physical aspect of the Antiquatis Institute off the ground since the required amount of land for a fully functioning self sustaining community would be much larger than 20 acres. Ideal climate conditions for the Monastery would be some place that has average highs all year not ranging greater than mid 70's to mid 90's and the average lows not surpassing mid 50's to mid 70's. Take a look at the average conditions for the coastal areas of Panama as that has been the most discussed location for Kheb. However, climates that could work for a self sufficient community of the type we are considering will range anywhere from temperate to tropical, the designs would just be different. Flowing water really is almost a must, and artesian springs are highly desired as well. Totally flat land is undesirable and so is overly mountainous or hilly terrain. A nice Goldilocks zone is preferable since natural contours allow for greater efficacy and variety in design. Some parts we would like to be more on the flat side and for others steady not to steep inclines work better. With any successful Permaculture design you want to create/foster as great a diversity in habitats as possible. A spectrum of field to forest is desirable. To really get a better understanding of all this I would peruse the Permaculture literature.
"To resist the influence of others, knowledge of ones self is most important." Teal'c

Billy
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Re: Developing Community

Post by Billy » Mon Jul 17, 2017 7:56 pm

To really get a better understanding of all this, I would peruse the Permaculture literature.
As a follow up to this: Though a great deal of literature exists on this particular subject, I have been told by many that a good place to start is with the work of Japanese farmer and philosopher Masanobu Fukuoka:

WEBSITE: http://www.onestrawrevolution.net/One_S ... ution.html

His books 'The One Straw Revolution' as well as 'Sowing Seeds in the Desert' appear to have served as somewhat of a foundation for a great deal of the Permaculture design being implemented and practiced today. I myself am going to start here, as I've got a lot to learn here, and want to soak up as much knowledge as possible, as Permaculture itself truly does seem to serve as an integrated, whole systems approach, and would be something that we would most definitely want to implement as part of any physical location for Antiquatis and the Kheb Monastery.

roses
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Re: Developing Community

Post by roses » Sat Jul 29, 2017 4:58 pm

Hello friends,

I've recently returned to the Salt Lake area and would like to meet with those of you that have joined together for this purpose. I'd love to chat and talk about future plans. I'm a serious student of the Law of One.

--roses

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joeyv23
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Re: Developing Community

Post by joeyv23 » Sat Jul 29, 2017 6:00 pm

    roses wrote:
    Sat Jul 29, 2017 4:58 pm
    Hello friends,

    I've recently returned to the Salt Lake area and would like to meet with those of you that have joined together for this purpose. I'd love to chat and talk about future plans. I'm a serious student of the Law of One.

    --roses
    I've sent a private message with my contact info. Looking forward to it!
    "Living is not necessary, but navigation is." --Pompey
    "Navigation is necessary in order to live." --Me

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    joeyv23
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    Heartwater Farm

    Post by joeyv23 » Thu Aug 10, 2017 2:50 pm

    Trophy Real Estate, the firm in charge of the for sale listing for Heartwater Farm has put together and released a video to showcase the property. Thought you all here might enjoy it. I haven't heard the audio that's attached and am using a computer at work that doesn't allow me to listen first--I ended up seeing the video in its raw format before the finishing touches were added before publishing it. This video does a fantastic job of capturing the essence of the place. After Austin's and my trip back down this past weekend, where things stand is fairly clear. Where it's the "Homesteaders vs the Buyers", the homesteaders (us) have the advantage of the home team (John and Rhonda) pulling for us. Without further ado:

    "Living is not necessary, but navigation is." --Pompey
    "Navigation is necessary in order to live." --Me

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    aaron
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    Re: Developing Community

    Post by aaron » Fri Aug 11, 2017 8:05 am

    joeyv23 wrote:
    Thu Aug 10, 2017 2:50 pm
    After Austin's and my trip back down this past weekend, where things stand is fairly clear. Where it's the "Homesteaders vs the Buyers", the homesteaders (us) have the advantage of the home team (John and Rhonda) pulling for us. Without further ado:
    Hey Joey,

    Interesting. You mention that the Homesteaders have the advantage because the owners are in your corner- but at the same time they are still listing it for sale. So does this mean that if they get an acceptable offer to buy it outright they are going to pursue this? And I suppose this means the homesteaders of the SLT crew will be compensated out of the sale for any improvements made and or time vested? (I ask because this would infer that the property value is a moving target and continually increases in price if the Homesteaders are involved?)

    Is there any idea of what the asking price is to buy it outright?

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    joeyv23
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    Re: Developing Community

    Post by joeyv23 » Fri Aug 11, 2017 1:28 pm

    aaron wrote:
    Fri Aug 11, 2017 8:05 am
    joeyv23 wrote:
    Thu Aug 10, 2017 2:50 pm
    After Austin's and my trip back down this past weekend, where things stand is fairly clear. Where it's the "Homesteaders vs the Buyers", the homesteaders (us) have the advantage of the home team (John and Rhonda) pulling for us. Without further ado:
    Hey Joey,

    Interesting. You mention that the Homesteaders have the advantage because the owners are in your corner- but at the same time they are still listing it for sale. So does this mean that if they get an acceptable offer to buy it outright they are going to pursue this? And I suppose this means the homesteaders of the SLT crew will be compensated out of the sale for any improvements made and or time vested? (I ask because this would infer that the property value is a moving target and continually increases in price if the Homesteaders are involved?)

    Is there any idea of what the asking price is to buy it outright?
    Our timing was interesting coming into the picture for them. In fact, the exact day that they made their decision to go ahead and list the property, Billy initiated contact. The decision for them comes after several of the last years' failure to launch, so to speak, with folks that were supposed to come in and help, with the potential to move forward from there with something similar to what we've been pursuing mentioned above in earlier posts. They essentially had to list the property for their peace of mind and security for retirement away from the farm. If it doesn't sell, and they are aware of that as a possibility, then things could then potentially move forward for us considering things continue to go well with our visits down. The listing is contracted for 12 months as of about a month ago. They set it up to be locked in for that period of time so there's no getting out of or around it. If a buyer comes along and can afford the property, and would follow the stipulations set forth in the contract, namely that the property is to be managed a certain way... someone won't be able to come in, buy the farm and then level it... they'll go forward with the sale. The things we've been doing so far aren't really increasing the value of the property, but it was made clear during our first visit that were we to contribute a large amount of energy into doing this such thing (building the garage up to be habitable for instance) and the property sells, then there would be compensation for the value added. This situation would be more applicable in the case of one or more of us making a move to be down interning and working there regularly. I'm not sure about the value being a moving target, I'd thought about it as well but didn't ask while we were there last weekend. The property is listed and firm at $1.2M which includes the property as well as all of the 100 year old water rights.
    "Living is not necessary, but navigation is." --Pompey
    "Navigation is necessary in order to live." --Me

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