Overview of Kheb, the Monastery

Kheb is a monastery, remote but not secluded, where people can have an alternative to the mercantile system that is imposed upon society by our political and educational institutions. It is a physical PLACE, and this topic is to discuss the facilities, structures, accommodations, and other physical constructs needed to successfully implement the ideas behind the Sanctuary Project, as well as the "political" structures of a new type of monastic system.
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LoneBear
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Overview of Kheb, the Monastery

Post by LoneBear » Sat Sep 26, 2009 1:12 pm

Overview of Kheb, the Monastery
Reconnecting with Nature through Self-sufficiency
It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly.
Bertrand Russell
“Have you ever dreamed of a place, far away from it all…” begins the theme to the 1973 classic musical, Lost Horizon, based on James Hilton’s 1933 novel about the secluded monastery of Shangri-La in the Himalayan mountains, sitting as in inspiration to all that there can be a better way to spend your life.

Kheb3 is a monastery, remote but not secluded, where people can have an alternative to the mercantile system that is imposed upon society by our political and educational institutions.

Goals
  1. To develop a healthy, physical body and lifestyle based on organic foods and energetic techniques, such as Qigong or Tai Chi.
  2. Develop thinking and intuition to higher levels, based on the processes of nature, to become intelligent in both knowledge and “street” sense.
  3. To use the strong body and strong mind to create a strong, enduring spirit—intelligence coupled with ethics, resulting in wisdom.
  4. To develop a lifestyle based on compassion, kindness and open sharing that can be a living example to others who seek a similar path.
  5. To make this knowledge and process available to those whom seek it, through books, lectures, workshops and the Internet.
Self-Sufficiency

“Self-sufficiency” means being able to provide for the basic needs of food, water, clothing and shelter, without having to purchase or engage in trade to obtain these objects.

In order to achieve these goals, a physical foundation—a “community”—is required as a starting point. The initial goal of the community is self-sufficiency—not to be dependent upon society to provide the basic necessities of life. This can be achieved through organic farming and ranching (humans are, by design, omnivorous), private wells or rivers, and either naturally available energy (gas, wood) or alternative energy (solar power, wind power or zero-point modules). Structures should be designed with Feng Shui in mind, to keep a proper bioenergetic balance through the community and to account for differing needs for individuals and families.

Self-sufficient design depends strongly upon the available resources. It is always best to use what is available, but resources should only be consumed if they can be renewed. For example, if you burn wood for heat and cooking, plant trees to replace what has been use, and a little more, so you are always on a positive-surplus curve. Always create more than you consume.

The Power Process: Getting Back to Nature, and Loving It

Self-sufficiency also infers a lot of hard work, as gardens need to be tended, cows milked, buildings repaired. But one will find quick enough that there is a high degree of satisfaction that comes when you actually see the results of your labors--food to eat, beautiful gardens and landscapes, comfortable places to live. This is the result of a concept called The Power Process:
Industrial Society and its Future, Sec. 5 wrote:The power process has four elements. The three most clear-cut of these we call goal, effort and attainment of goal. (Everyone needs to have goals whose attainment requires effort, and needs to succeed in attaining at least some of his goals.) The fourth element is more difficult to define and may not be necessary for everyone. We call it autonomy and will discuss it later.

Consider the hypothetical case of a man who can have anything he wants just by wishing for it. Such a man has power, but he will develop serious psychological problems. At first he will have a lot of fun, but by and by he will become acutely bored and demoralized. Eventually he may become clinically depressed. History shows that leisured aristocracies tend to become decadent. This is not true of fighting aristocracies that have to struggle to maintain their power. But leisured, secure aristocracies that have no need to exert themselves usually become bored, hedonistic and demoralized, even though they have power. This shows that power is not enough. One must have goals toward which to exercise one's power.

Everyone has goals; if nothing else, to obtain the physical necessities of life: food, water and whatever clothing and shelter are made necessary by the climate. But the leisured aristocrat obtains these things without effort. Hence his boredom and demoralization.

Non-attainment of important goals results in death if the goals are physical necessities, and in frustration if non-attainment of the goals is compatible with survival. Consistent failure to attain goals throughout life results in defeatism, low self-esteem or depression.

Thus, in order to avoid serious psychological problems, a human being needs goals whose attainment requires effort and he must have a reasonable rate of success in attaining his goals.
There are two schools of thought regarding who does the work, in a self-sufficient system. First, is that "everyone should share the load" equally. Second, is that "experts do what they do best."

Sharing the load results in more leisure time, but can also produce disastrous results should an incompetent person damage a critical system--such as destroying a crop. Expertise will give excellent results, but has the tendency to "burn out" a person because of the constant demands on their time.

The approach for the Kheb Monastery comes from the tried-and-true methods of the ancient Trade Guilds, where you have a group of "experts" that "share the load" amongst themselves. This also opens the opportunity for intellectual development, through the apprentice system. (Expertise is also a renewable resource, as long as you have the old sharing with the young.)

In order for people to complete the power process, there needs to be failure to learn from, as well as success. For this, a degree of autonomy is required:
Industrial Society and its Future, Sec. 7 wrote:Autonomy as a part of the power process may not be necessary for every individual. But most people need a greater or lesser degree of autonomy in working toward their goals. Their efforts must be undertaken on their own initiative and must be under their own direction and control. Yet most people do not have to exert this initiative, direction and control as single individuals. It is usually enough to act as a member of a small group. Thus if half a dozen people discuss a goal among themselves and make a successful joint effort to attain that goal, their need for the power process will be served. But if they work under rigid orders handed down from above that leave them no room for autonomous decision and initiative, then their need for the power process will not be served. The same is true when decisions are made on a collective bases if the group making the collective decision is so large that the role of each individual is insignificant...

But for most people it is through the power process—having a goal, making an AUTONOMOUS effort and attaining the goal—that self-esteem, self-confidence and a sense of power are acquired. When one does not have adequate opportunity to go throughout the power process, the consequences are (depending on the individual and on the way the power process is disrupted) boredom, demoralization, low self-esteem, inferiority feelings, defeatism, depression, anxiety, guilt, frustration, hostility, spouse or child abuse, insatiable hedonism, abnormal sexual behavior, sleep disorders, eating disorders, etc.
Self-sufficiency, done in the style of the old Trade Guilds, not only provides what is needed but also gives a sense of accomplishment and personal effectiveness through the Power process. But this is not limited to the physical aspects of the body... it can also be applied to the mind (through intellectual challenges) and the spirit, resulting in a different kind of "satisfaction", which the Greeks refer to as Agapé--a connection with God and Nature.

3 Kheb (or Khebet), in ancient Egyptian mythology, is a sanctuary where Isis hid Horus, to protect him from being slain by Seth. Kheb was popularized by the Stargate SG-1 television series as a place where the Ancients left records of how to ascend to a higher plane of existence.

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Re: Overview of Kheb, the Monastery

Post by LoneBear » Wed Feb 03, 2010 11:38 pm

I've received a number of requests about the "path" of Kheb, versus the physical, monastic system. So, I'm putting together some documentation on what I've learned so far... check in at the main website, under the Kheb Monastery domain for details.

Going to start with some background information, then the details of "Level 1," which basically amounts to a test to see if YOU consider YOURSELF worthy enough to walk the path of the Magnum Opus. It is ALWAYS a personal choice, as well as a personal EFFORT. I'm happy to discuss the details and help with interpretation, as is any other student on the Path, but you MUST carry your own weight, do the research you need to do, execute the meditations and contemplations and perform the physical work on your own. Unlike most systems, this is NOT a "group effort", but an individuated, personal one. At least for a while... until the student becomes the teacher, and must engage a Paduwan to continue on past a certain point.

Just remember that EACH PATH IS UNIQUE. We may walk the SAME terrain, but seldom follow the same course, because we've all lived different lives, had different experiences, and come to value things we like and hate differently. Keep this in mind, as the "order" I present things in will be where the main path is, and you may encounter "later" things earlier on, and not run in to "early" things until much later. Depends how much you wander off the beaten path. (Not that I'm accusing anyone of being a Wanderer... just that Elders like to explore "beyond the rim.")

Please feel free to discuss any topics here on the forum, if you do not feel your comments would be appropriate for a general audience, because the main site is indexed by the search engines regularly, and there are a number of forums here that are hidden, to protect your privacy.

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