Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

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Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by joeyv23 » Tue Nov 21, 2017 9:55 pm

Had an interesting couple of conversations yesterday that have left some things rumbling around in my mind that I want to share.

The question is... Is the ability to emotionally detach from any given person/place/moment a blessing or a curse?

I think most would say that having the ability to detach from emotions as an indicator of something being broken, because, hey, as humans, we're supposed to feel emotions and live/act in accordance with what those emotions are indicating, right?

I propose, as hard as this might be to swallow, that in order to move forward with our personal human evolution, it seems that some extreme form of trauma that makes a person cut themselves off from their emotional attachment to people/events is required. It doesn't necessarily have to have happened in this incarnation. For me, it did. For the two other people I know who are wired the same way, it's the same - some traumatic experience that led us to be, to the casual observer - broken. My question here is: Are we though?

When walking this path of evolution one inevitably comes across this concept of individuation as is so often discussed here in the fora and on CH. Individuation requires severing the binding ties that maintain us within the collective mentality of our species. What better way for this to happen than some trauma that causes us to, of our own accord, forgo our humanity for some time and find out who/what we are outside of the boundaries of this constraint.

This doesn't mean that we are incapable of feeling emotions or using them as a tool for our everyday interactions with our inner and outer realities. It means that we can choose to be affected or not. To give an example,.. earlier this year my German Shepherd passed away. There was a moment when I found out he had died (he was left with my family in Georgia some time ago) that I had the opportunity to not be affected by it. In that moment, rather than not be affected, I chose to feel the loss of this pet because I knew there was a projection that had occurred between the dog and myself, and I would need to act in accordance with this in order to deal with resolving the issue surrounding the projection. Here we can see where grief can have a proper place in our lives as a conscious choice.

This mode of existence doesn't make one a misanthropist. I am still a human, and I have the capability to hold compassion for individuals within the collective as well as the collective as a whole. I can care and act in accordance to that. I can just as easily receive news that the little old lady that I checked out of my hotel died on her way home, and choose to act in accordance with an understanding of karma and the dynamics associated with the process of transmigration and it not affect me at all. This example may not lend to the totality of this capability so I'll give another example. I can apply that same knowledge to people that I know personally in my life and their struggles/hardships/termination and if I so choose, act in accordance with that. Whichever scenario ends up being the result of learning of some trauma experienced by any one of these people will be a matter of choice, not a matter of being subject to programmed emotional response that is usually taken as a sign of good mental/emotional health.

Or maybe I'm "broken"... but I'll leave that to the reader to decide for themselves.


--Edit for punctuation-- (see below)
Last edited by joeyv23 on Wed Nov 22, 2017 5:31 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by LoneBear » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:19 am

joeyv23 wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 9:55 pm
The question is... Is the ability to emotionally detach from any given person/place/moment a blessing or a curse?
The mean green meme is called "human bond" for a reason. It is "emotional bondage," the tying of one person to another through projection, identification and transference.

Having spent my youth being known as "Mr. Spock," the logical, non-emotional Vulcan from classic Star Trek, I consider it an advantage--not a gift bestowed by some god. For me, it was a personal choice. Being empathic from birth, I could not handle the emotional chaos I was constantly being exposed to--could not even differentiate my own emotions from those of others. By using the Vulcan philosophy, I was able to block out those emotions and keep my sanity... and my life... and by doing so, discovered something about "emotions"...

Emotions are NOT the same thing as feelings. Emotions are part of the primal human, the instinctive reaction that is designed to operate as a survival mechanism. Because emotions are nonlocal (cosmic, soul side of things), they operate instantaneously--it takes NO clock time to process the information, to decide on a course of action. You just DO IT (reaction).

Feelings, however, are the soul's way of processing temporal information from intuition--not the same thing, as personal judgement and choice are involved in the feeling process. Just as you can THINK, then decide, you can also FEEL, then decide. Not the case with emotion, which is not part of those rational, valuing systems and is survival reactive.

If you use logic and feelings to analyze your question, it does not take much effort to realize that emotions can be used as a mechanism of control of the weak-minded (much like "The Force"), because they are reactive, not pro-active (as thinking and feeling are). A person will react, then get stuck with the consequences. By linking people together, emotionally, they are literally in "human bondage" with chains stronger than any metal. And it is much easier to manipulate a bunch of muggles as one, collective group tied together in a web of emotions, thinking and acting the same, than it is to deal with ONE rebellious individual--who WILL think and feel things through, before taking action.

The self-acclaimed "leaders" of our societies rely on emotion to do all the dirty work. If you ever become involved with covert intelligence or "psy-ops," it is the first thing they teach. You do not want people thinking or feeling--you want a REACTION to a circumstance that you have set up ahead of time, so they just run exactly to where you want to go... mentally, spiritually, ethically and physically. Then you have them where you want them--and they can do nothing about it, because they don't even know how they got there.

Feelings are a consequence of having and individuated soul; emotions are still "group mind." Whereas individuation is part of the evolution of consciousness, emotional detachment is a "natural consequence" of that evolution--out with the old (emotions) and in with the new (feelings).

Because feelings are decisive, you can CHOOSE to feel what you feel, rather than be forced into an emotional reaction, just as you describe.
joeyv23 wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 9:55 pm
Or maybe I'm broken... but I'll leave that to the reader to decide for themselves.
Or maybe you're just evolving... but I'll leave that to the reader to decide for themselves.

Of course it is easier to be "broken," then you're a victim and don't have to think and feel for yourself--someone else will do it for you. And you don't even have to seek them out--every commercial interaction you experience, in a world based on commerce, is about keeping people victims and providing "relief," through purchasing power, for that victimization. Your post is more about looking to find a way to stay IN the Matrix--now that you've been shown what is outside of it.

Personally, I prefer to be Neo. It is far more interesting than being a member of the "mindless masses." Particularly when you've seen the blue mist... humanity's unconscious answer to the macrobe.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by joeyv23 » Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:48 am

LoneBear wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:19 am
joeyv23 wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 9:55 pm
Or maybe I'm broken... but I'll leave that to the reader to decide for themselves.
Or maybe you're just evolving... but I'll leave that to the reader to decide for themselves.

Of course it is easier to be "broken," then you're a victim and don't have to think and feel for yourself--someone else will do it for you. And you don't even have to seek them out--every commercial interaction you experience, in a world based on commerce, is about keeping people victims and providing "relief," through purchasing power, for that victimization. Your post is more about looking to find a way to stay IN the Matrix--now that you've been shown what is outside of it.
Interesting Freudian slip on my part... Though it didn't end up in my post, in my mind the word broken was meant to be encapsulated by quotation marks. If read in this way, there's a different message conveyed.
Personally, I prefer to be Neo. It is far more interesting than being a member of the "mindless masses." Particularly when you've seen the blue mist... humanity's unconscious answer to the macrobe.
Although I cant find it, a while back I posted something on fb about the "mythic" next step being that each individual become Neo. The missing quotations around the word broken above have their impact here, because I know that I'm not. I share the preference.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by Ilkka » Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:49 am

LoneBear wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:19 am
Because feelings are decisive, you can CHOOSE to feel what you feel, rather than be forced into an emotional reaction.
I guess this goes for the emotional reaction towards annoying noises from neigbors as well, which makes one angry?

I've been getting angry almost every night. At around 4 am they make a ruckus with their dog that apparently needs to go out on its business and that wake up infuriates me beyond all reason. They have a tendency to disregard the rules set for all residents, one being from 10 pm - 6 am should be quiet time, for obvious reasons.

Well, that is probably the "forced into an emotional reaction" situation I described that is difficult to choose not feel/"emote".
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by animus » Wed Nov 22, 2017 4:13 am

Joey, remember your last pm a month ago, where you said that I seemed to be tuned in in your conversations? Well, looks like I did it again yesterday... I had similar thoughts around midnight (UTC +1).
LoneBear wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:19 am
The self-acclaimed "leaders" of our societies rely on emotion to do all the dirty work. If you ever become involved with covert intelligence or "psy-ops," it is the first thing they teach. You do not want people thinking or feeling--you want a REACTION to a circumstance that you have set up ahead of time, so they just run exactly to where you want to go... mentally, spiritually, ethically and physically. Then you have them where you want them--and they can do nothing about it, because they don't even know how they got there.
Two years ago I was sitting in a train with three other students who I didn't know. We were talking about some worldly problems and reached the topic conspiracy theories. When hitting that topic I felt the atmosphere slowly getting "heavier". But as soon as I mentioned the holocaust, man... it was like they were attacking me with their very uncomfortable emotions. The unease came instantly just by the vocalization of the word alone. That word has a lot of power over people!

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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by LoneBear » Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:21 am

joeyv23 wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:48 am
Although I cant find it, a while back I posted something on fb about the "mythic" next step being that each individual become Neo. The missing quotations around the word broken above have their impact here, because I know that I'm not. I share the preference.
I see two possibilities:
  1. Parts of you still feel broken, hence the Freudian slip.
  2. Perhaps a broken person needed to read this, to help get their pieces back together.
Ilkka wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:49 am
Well, that is probably the "forced into an emotional reaction" situation I described that is difficult to choose not feel/"emote".
Or, you can just report them to the manager or local law enforcement for disturbing the peace.
animus wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 4:13 am
But as soon as I mentioned the holocaust, man... it was like they were attacking me with their very uncomfortable emotions. The unease came instantly just by the vocalization of the word alone. That word has a lot of power over people!
That is interesting, as it carries no meaning here in the United States... where most people think "holocaust" is a bug spray.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by Andrew » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:22 pm

joeyv23 wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:48 am


Interesting Freudian slip on my part... Though it didn't end up in my post, in my mind the word broken was meant to be encapsulated by quotation marks. If read in this way, there's a different message conveyed.
I don't see the significance. I'm trying to cut down on the quotations myself. Just say it how it is instead of trying to control so much how others will interpret it. It seems in this case you do feel broken and you received a proper message addressing that emotion. Putting quotes around terms all the time is akin to ending posts with IMO all the time. Its a trick of the unconscious to feel like it can express its thoughts while simultaneously not be held responsible for any criticism. Although I realize quotes do help when forming new connotations of terms. In this case, I see broken as having a temporal weight to it, whereas if you put quotes around it, "broken" sounds like you're trying to separate yourself from that weight.
LoneBear wrote:I see two possibilities:

Parts of you still feel broken, hence the Freudian slip.
I see a little more why you referred to having an emotion as a Freuden slip, but I always thought slips come from repressed material, which is different from detached material. Repressed material occurs because the psyche doesn't know how to incorporate the emotion harmoniously in a group-mind, and so the material slips out over time resulting in a, usually awkward, Uh-oh socially.
Perhaps a broken person needed to read this, to help get their pieces back together.
I'll say that this thread has helped me today. The difference between emotion and feeling makes more sense now. Feeling has become another tool in my mind in processing value, akin to thinking, but equal and opposite, having presence in the cosmic sector.
animus wrote:Two years ago I was sitting in a train with three other students who I didn't know. We were talking about some worldly problems and reached the topic conspiracy theories. When hitting that topic I felt the atmosphere slowly getting "heavier". But as soon as I mentioned the holocaust, man... it was like they were attacking me with their very uncomfortable emotions. The unease came instantly just by the vocalization of the word alone. That word has a lot of power over people!
I know exactly what you mean. I bet if I went out in public bringing up the holocaust I would not receive very pleasant feedback at all! I'm pretty sure the ego protects those that know the truth from talking about it outside their computers for this very reason. My mom still gives me grief for presenting contrary evidence to the official narrative of the holocaust. It's just not something people discuss outside the remember the 6 million meme. You can't question that class of victimhood. You can never know their level of victimhood. In Germany, you can't even question it without facing jail time!

No, the unconscious force of the Holocaust is indeed strong. The story combines extreme government persecution and extreme religious persecution. Unless you have ethical control units, you won't be able to see any cracks in that prison, as it plays off both dialectics of authority. To any muggle, questioning the Holocaust is an act aligned with evil.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by LoneBear » Wed Nov 22, 2017 5:05 pm

Andrew wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:22 pm
I don't see the significance. I'm trying to cut down on the quotations myself. Just say it how it is instead of trying to control so much how others will interpret it. It seems in this case you do feel broken and you received a proper message addressing that emotion.
Use quotes where appropriate. But I do recommend "say what you mean and mean what you say." There is no need to be ambiguous on this site, particularly on the non-searchable fora.

And that is in quotes because it is a common phrase, not something I came up with.

During my last Defense Against the Dark Arts class, Joey finally figured out how to honestly express himself, and when he heard himself do it... his jaw dropped wide open with understanding. Often, a person must go through "external honesty" before than can have "internal honesty." His post was probably motivated by that event.

Quotes used here to group the adjectives with the nouns, to express a dichotomy of concept.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by joeyv23 » Wed Nov 22, 2017 5:29 pm

LoneBear wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:21 am
joeyv23 wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:48 am
Although I cant find it, a while back I posted something on fb about the "mythic" next step being that each individual become Neo. The missing quotations around the word broken above have their impact here, because I know that I'm not. I share the preference.
I see two possibilities:
  1. Parts of you still feel broken, hence the Freudian slip.
  2. Perhaps a broken person needed to read this, to help get their pieces back together.
The latter was the intention, even though it didn't come out that way. I've edited the original post to reflect. If there's something in me that feels broken it's still unconscious, because consciously I no longer feel that way.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by LoneBear » Thu Nov 23, 2017 10:29 am

joeyv23 wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 5:29 pm
The latter was the intention, even though it didn't come out that way. I've edited the original post to reflect. If there's something in me that feels broken it's still unconscious, because consciously I no longer feel that way.
If something is still broken--it will come out next Thursday, since "broken" means "failure."

I would advise what I've been teaching in class--be proactive--dig it out. Let it be heard now, so you have time to negotiate. It might be well hidden and the last thing you want is to feed it after midnight, early Thursday morning.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by joeyv23 » Fri Nov 24, 2017 5:13 pm

LoneBear wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 10:29 am
I would advise what I've been teaching in class--be proactive--dig it out. Let it be heard now, so you have time to negotiate. It might be well hidden and the last thing you want is to feed it after midnight, early Thursday morning.
Found it. Am addressing it. Failure isn't an acceptable option so definitely won't be making gremlins to carry with me to my interview.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by LoneBear » Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:33 am

joeyv23 wrote:
Fri Nov 24, 2017 5:13 pm
Found it. Am addressing it. Failure isn't an acceptable option so definitely won't be making gremlins to carry with me to my interview.
Also understand that you can succeed at the interview, yet fail to get the job because someone more qualified also applied. That is out of your control. But this time of year, there probably will not be a whole lot of candidates... and if they prefer to hire from within, you stand an excellent chance.

As the old saying goes, "Trust in Allah, but tie up your camel." Wouldn't hurt to check out the other GMs, age, gender, background... that will tell you what they are looking for.

You should also review the teachings of Tzu--both Lao and Sun.

Lao Tzu shows you where real power comes from, on the inside.
Sun Tzu shows you how to use that power, on the outside.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by joeyv23 » Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:14 pm

LoneBear wrote:
Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:33 am
Also understand that you can succeed at the interview, yet fail to get the job because someone more qualified also applied. That is out of your control. But this time of year, there probably will not be a whole lot of candidates... and if they prefer to hire from within, you stand an excellent chance.
I've considered this and it'll have its place during the interview to be addressed.
As the old saying goes, "Trust in Allah, but tie up your camel." Wouldn't hurt to check out the other GMs, age, gender, background... that will tell you what they are looking for.
Middle aged white female is the norm across the properties. I am something this company is lacking which is very rare. There's very little masculine energy in the system. So while I'm not what they've sought before, I am what is needed.
You should also review the teachings of Tzu--both Lao and Sun.

Lao Tzu shows you where real power comes from, on the inside.
Sun Tzu shows you how to use that power, on the outside.
Thank you for the resource.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by Andrew » Sun Nov 26, 2017 5:09 pm

LoneBear wrote:
Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:33 am
Sun Tzu shows you how to use that power, on the outside.
I've had buying The Art of War in the back of my mind for a couple weeks now. Reading some of his famous quotes, I know one thing I'll be asking Santa and his elves for. :D Very invigorating.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by sovert » Mon Nov 27, 2017 12:07 pm

Andrew wrote:
Sun Nov 26, 2017 5:09 pm
LoneBear wrote:
Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:33 am
Sun Tzu shows you how to use that power, on the outside.
I've had buying The Art of War in the back of my mind for a couple weeks now. Reading some of his famous quotes, I know one thing I'll be asking Santa and his elves for. :D Very invigorating.

I would also recommend the read. There are also some excellent audiobook renditions, if you prefer listening. I've found that reading and listening fall upon my conciousness differently, providing two slightly different perspectives of the same material.
The teachings are similar in nature to those found in the Christian bible's book of Proverbs; observations on human nature and psychology and comments on The Way Things Are.

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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by animus » Tue Dec 12, 2017 11:26 pm

LoneBear wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:19 am
Personally, I prefer to be Neo. It is far more interesting than being a member of the "mindless masses." Particularly when you've seen the blue mist... humanity's unconscious answer to the macrobe.
Considering that the members of this forum are all about curiosity, we should be ashamed, myself included, that it needs numerous references to the blue mist until somebody asked "Would you please elaborate?" :)
Is that the same thing as the blue dimension that you recently mentioned?

LoneBear wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 5:05 pm
During my last Defense Against the Dark Arts class, Joey finally figured out [...]
This sounds exciting but when I picture it, I just see two people sitting on the floor with their eyes shut, seemingly doing nothing. :)
LoneBear wrote:
Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:33 am
As the old saying goes, "Trust in Allah, but tie up your camel."
:lol:

Andrew wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:22 pm
I know exactly what you mean. I bet if I went out in public bringing up the holocaust I would not receive very pleasant feedback at all! I'm pretty sure the ego protects those that know the truth from talking about it outside their computers for this very reason. My mom still gives me grief for presenting contrary evidence to the official narrative of the holocaust. It's just not something people discuss outside the remember the 6 million meme.
Little do people know that this 6 million meme started decades before WWII, see the following link: http://archive.is/pZi8b
It gives you 267 newspaper mentions of "Holocaust" and "6,000,000 Jews" between 1900 and 1945. Tell a lie often enough...
I didn't check all those 267 quotes but I found a picture collection showing a bunch of newspaper extracts (57 pictures, 18 mb): http://www48.zippyshare.com/v/VJsHecJ5/file.html
The few I did check, did check out. The earliest extract was from 1899, first picture in the album.
Don Heddesheimer wrote a book about this matter (6 mb): http://holocausthandbooks.com/dl/06-tfh.pdf
I haven't read it myself but from what I read about it, all this crying wolf was a decades long donation campaign. Well, that sounds awfully familiar...

Andrew wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:22 pm
You can't question that class of victimhood. You can never know their level of victimhood. In Germany, you can't even question it without facing jail time!
Even lawyers are faced with a lawsuit just for doing their job when they defend somebody who questions the Holocaust. Usually they just pay their fine and then shut up about it. That's why the public never hears of this. Neither do people know that undesired books are still burned to this day! One would think Germans had learned their lesson... Nope.
And get this: If you are a denier and have to go to court for it and are then asked "How come you deny it?" you will get yet another lawsuit because you just did it again!
And you are pretty much not allowed to ask for any official records that prove the murder of 6 million Jews. (Obviously there are none.) The judge simply says that the Holocaust is a given and doesn't need to be proved because everybody knows about it. "It is a commonly known fact."
That's how the world works nowadays. If it wasn't in the newspaper, it didn't happen. If it was in the newspaper, it did happen. Or as daniel said: truth defined by popular consent.

Here is something from the verdict of the Frankfurt Auschwitz trials:
Lfd.Nr.595a, LG Frankfurt/M., 19.08.1965, JuNSV Bd.XXI S.433 wrote: Therefore, in the investigation of the crimes committed by the defendants the court was almost solely reliant on testimonies. [...] In addition, there were hardly any witnesses who witnessed the incidents at the Auschwitz concentration camp as neutral observers. [...]

[...] the court lacked almost all of the evidence that is usually available in a normal murder trial in order to get a true picture of the actual events at the time of the murder. Missing were the bodies of the victims, autopsy reports, experts' reports on the cause of death and the hour of death, traces of the perpetrators, murder weapons etc. Examination of the testimonies was only possible in rare cases. [...]
I have never really studied the Holocaust but with this information alone, that I have put into this post, it doesn't take a genius to put 1 and 1 together...

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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by LoneBear » Wed Dec 13, 2017 10:58 am

animus wrote:
Tue Dec 12, 2017 11:26 pm
Considering that the members of this forum are all about curiosity, we should be ashamed, myself included, that it needs numerous references to the blue mist...
I made those references out of curiosity, after a discussion with Joe on the lack of curiosity on fora (and generally all interactive media). It is interesting how "obey without question" seems to be the path of choice nowadays. Even those that purport to question are not actually questioning, but simply challenging authority--and ignoring the answers. Questioning for the sake of questioning is pointless. Life is like an old Sherlock Holmes mystery... got to ask the right questions and listen closely to the answers, if you're going to figure life out.
animus wrote:
Tue Dec 12, 2017 11:26 pm
...until somebody asked "Would you please elaborate?" :)
Proposing a question is not asking it... so still waiting for somebody to ask! :D

In ancient magical systems, there is a great deal of information and instruction that cannot be volunteered--it must be explicitly asked for. Something the Harry Potter series overlooked.
animus wrote:
Tue Dec 12, 2017 11:26 pm
Is that the same thing as the blue dimension that you recently mentioned?
Yes, with an additional inference to a classic episode of Lost in Space, "Wild Adventure," where the Robinsons first encounter the people of the "green dimension," who live in the void of space and have an unusual appetite for deutronium fuel.
Athena.jpg
People of the Green Dimension
Athena.jpg (25.98 KiB) Viewed 2272 times
This episode is also where the "mystery music" I spoke of in my private forum originates.
animus wrote:
Tue Dec 12, 2017 11:26 pm
LoneBear wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 5:05 pm
During my last Defense Against the Dark Arts class, Joey finally figured out [...]
This sounds exciting but when I picture it, I just see two people sitting on the floor with their eyes shut, seemingly doing nothing. :)
Not exactly... before one can defend against the Dark Arts, one must experience them--and that is an intensely corporeal process, not a mental one.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by animus » Wed Dec 13, 2017 11:36 am

LoneBear wrote:
Wed Dec 13, 2017 10:58 am
Even those that purport to question are not actually questioning, but simply challenging authority--and ignoring the answers. Questioning for the sake of questioning is pointless.
Just want to throw in here that not replying to a given answer and ignoring it altogether can easily be confused because without a reply neither one can be determined to be the actual case.
But I do see the irony.
Proposing a question is not asking it... so still waiting for somebody to ask! :D
Not sure if I am missing the point here (imho it's just semantics), but here goes:
Dearest LoneBear, since I have been curious about this matter from the beginning, although apparently not enough to ask this earlier, I would very much like to know what concept lies behind the words "blue mist". Would you, who has already shared so much valuable knowledge with us, please enlighten me (us) once more? :)

Not exactly... before one can defend against the Dark Arts, one must experience them--and that is an intensely corporeal process, not a mental one.
Hopefully you don't have to experience it to the most extreme degree to defend against it. E.g.: It suffices that I hold my hand above a lighter to know that I should never go into a bonfire. Does this sort of thinking (or feeling) relate to the Dark Arts as well?

edit: I am putting Lost in Space on my to-watch list. Too many references here to ignore it. Somehow I have feeling that at one point, with all these Sci-Fi references here, I will even bring myself to watch the entire Star Trek franchise ...and probably end up becoming a Trekkie myself. Not there yet though! Still have to bring myself to give Flatland another try.

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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by LoneBear » Wed Dec 13, 2017 12:28 pm

animus wrote:
Wed Dec 13, 2017 11:36 am
Not sure if I am missing the point here (imho it's just semantics), but here goes:
It is very common in English for someone to propose a question, rather than ask for an answer--which is not a question. For example: "Could you explain that?" not "Please explain that." The answer to the former is, "Yes, I could," with no explanation. The answer to the latter is the explanation.

I use this at the shopping malls this time of year, with all those annoying booth operators that are always coming up to you and asking, "Can I ask you a question?" in hopes to trap you into a sales pitch. I reply, "You just did" and walk away, making a clean escape while their mind seizes.
animus wrote:
Wed Dec 13, 2017 11:36 am
Dearest LoneBear, since I have been curious about this matter from the beginning, although apparently not enough to ask this earlier, I would very much like to know what concept lies behind the words "blue mist". Would you, who has already shared so much valuable knowledge with us, please enlighten me (us) once more? :)
What is more interesting is that both you and Andrew made technology-related posts today concerning the interaction of consciousness with technology--which is what the Blue Mist is all about. That is just "too weird"... almost as though your subconscious minds are seeking the answer, but your conscious minds were not allowing the actual question to formulate and be asked.

Sure, I'll explain, but it will have to be later today, as I have to head off to some appointments now.
animus wrote:
Wed Dec 13, 2017 11:36 am
Hopefully you don't have to experience it to the most extreme degree to defend against it. E.g.: It suffices that I hold my hand above a lighter to know that I should never go into a bonfire. Does this sort of thinking (or feeling) relate to the Dark Arts as well?
Since the body and Dark Arts are on the same side of the unit boundary, there is no "reciprocal relation"--magnitude of experience correlates directly with magnitude of gain. However the Dark Arts include a great deal of misdirection--things are not always as they seem. You may be challenged to walk into a bonfire, butt naked... which most people would be highly reluctant to do. But if you did, you may discover it was a hologram, not the real thing, and no harm could possibly come to you. It still takes the same amount of free will, determination and the ability to overcome your internal fears and biases to get the job done, whether it was real or imagined--and the gains obtained from the experience are always real and tangible (which is why the Dark Side of the Force is faster). But... you never know if a test is real or imagined. That is what you learn in Defense Against the Dark Arts--how to use your intelligence to differentiate the two.
animus wrote:
Wed Dec 13, 2017 11:36 am
edit: I am putting Lost in Space on my to-watch list. Too many references here to ignore it. Somehow I have feeling that at one point, with all these Sci-Fi references here, I will even bring myself to watch the entire Star Trek franchise ...and probably end up becoming a Trekkie myself. Not there yet though! Still have to bring myself to give Flatland another try.
For Flatland, read the book. Way better than the film.

The old Lost in Space series (1965-1968) shows man as a pioneer and explorer, working together to overcome challenges. Something that, IMHO, is now "Lost in America." First season (in B&W) is the best. It gets a bit silly after that.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by joeyv23 » Fri Dec 15, 2017 8:27 pm

LoneBear wrote:
Wed Dec 13, 2017 10:58 am
I made those references out of curiosity, after a discussion with Joe on the lack of curiosity on fora (and generally all interactive media). It is interesting how "obey without question" seems to be the path of choice nowadays. Even those that purport to question are not actually questioning, but simply challenging authority--and ignoring the answers. Questioning for the sake of questioning is pointless. Life is like an old Sherlock Holmes mystery... got to ask the right questions and listen closely to the answers, if you're going to figure life out.
I'm getting ready to dive into the work of Arthur Schopenhauer, given I've found myself sitting with a worldview that (to my knowledge) is shared at least in part by only one other person, Schopenhauer himself. In the preface to his seminal work The World as Will and Idea I found something that I think fits well here.
Arthur Schopenhauer wrote:It is self-evident that under these circumstances no other advice can be given as to how one may enter into the thought explained in this work than to read the book twice, and the first time with great patience, a patience which is only to be derived from the belief, voluntarily accorded, that the beginning presupposes the end almost as much as the end presupposes the beginning, and that all the earlier parts presuppose the later almost as much as the later presuppose the earlier. I say “almost;” for this is by no means absolutely the case, and I have honestly and conscientiously done all that was possible to give priority to that which stands least in need of explanation from what follows, as indeed generally to everything that can help to make the thought as easy to comprehend and as distinct as possible. This might indeed to a certain extent be achieved if it were not that the reader, as is very natural, thinks, as he reads, not merely of what is actually said, but also of its possible consequences, and thus besides the many contradictions actually given of the opinions [ix] of the time, and presumably of the reader, there may be added as many more which are anticipated and imaginary. That, then, which is really only misunderstanding, must take the form of active disapproval, and it is all the more difficult to recognise that it is misunderstanding, because although the laboriously-attained clearness of the explanation and distinctness of the expression never leaves the immediate sense of what is said doubtful, it cannot at the same time express its relations to all that remains to be said.
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by LoneBear » Fri Dec 15, 2017 8:45 pm

joeyv23 wrote:
Fri Dec 15, 2017 8:27 pm
I'm getting ready to dive into the work of Arthur Schopenhauer, given I've found myself sitting with a worldview that (to my knowledge) is shared at least in part by only one other person, Schopenhauer himself.
Hopefully there is still water in the pool, after all these years, or you may be in for a disappointment.

Here's a thought... the guy died in 1860, so you've probably already read him (or even talked with him), and that influence is just a bit of carry-over from the other incarnation. Just access what you already know via the Akashic records. Only takes a minute, and then you'll know what it was about, what you thought of it, where the issues were and exactly what the bits you decided to "keep" with you for this incarnation.

As --daniel will be pointing out in his next paper, you cannot learn from the past because history is a planned deception... all you can do is waste enormous amounts of time trying to undo the deception--anchoring you there, so you'll never break loose and go out exploring the Universe, unchained.

Personally, my choice is to split (an infinitive) and "boldly go where no man has gone before!"
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by animus » Fri Dec 15, 2017 9:09 pm

Arthur Schopenhauer wrote:This might indeed to a certain extent be achieved if it were not that the reader, as is very natural, thinks, as he reads, not merely of what is actually said, but also of its possible consequences, and thus besides the many contradictions actually given of the opinions [ix] of the time, and presumably of the reader, there may be added as many more which are anticipated and imaginary.
Schopenhauer should have familiarize himself with speed-reading because, if done right, there is little time to think besides what is related by the author.

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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by joeyv23 » Sat Dec 16, 2017 12:37 am

LoneBear wrote:
Fri Dec 15, 2017 8:45 pm
joeyv23 wrote:
Fri Dec 15, 2017 8:27 pm
I'm getting ready to dive into the work of Arthur Schopenhauer, given I've found myself sitting with a worldview that (to my knowledge) is shared at least in part by only one other person, Schopenhauer himself.
Hopefully there is still water in the pool, after all these years, or you may be in for a disappointment.

Here's a thought... the guy died in 1860, so you've probably already read him (or even talked with him), and that influence is just a bit of carry-over from the other incarnation. Just access what you already know via the Akashic records. Only takes a minute, and then you'll know what it was about, what you thought of it, where the issues were and exactly what the bits you decided to "keep" with you for this incarnation.

As --daniel will be pointing out in his next paper, you cannot learn from the past because history is a planned deception... all you can do is waste enormous amounts of time trying to undo the deception--anchoring you there, so you'll never break loose and go out exploring the Universe, unchained.

Personally, my choice is to split (an infinitive) and "boldly go where no man has gone before!"
I have no doubt that this is an issue of past life influence. Either I'm a living John Malkovich or really good at projecting, but he and I have way too many similarities for me to overlook and the fact that I arrived at this worldview in the same language that he uses, and he was/is the only one... makes me have to wonder at things. I'm checking my framework in comparison to his and adjusting it if/where necessary. Of his whole body of work, our ideas are only aligbed to a small degree. We share a basic postulate but he has additional postulates that I don't hold as my own.I'm nowhere near as big a pessimist as I may once have been. :)

As a reference point, our Defense Against the Dark Arts classes and discussions on power fit with what I've been working on for myself with will (my dragon) and I ended up coming to certain philosophical conclusions as natural consequences that I've only found in Schopenhauer's work. Take a look at the table of contents for this paper... I'm sure something will stick out at you ;) https://en.m.wikisource.org/wiki/On_the_Will_in_Nature
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Re: Emotional Trauma -- Blessing or Curse

Post by Andrew » Wed Dec 20, 2017 8:48 pm

It is very common in English for someone to propose a question, rather than ask for an answer--which is not a question. For example: "Could you explain that?" not "Please explain that." The answer to the former is, "Yes, I could," with no explanation. The answer to the latter is the explanation.
This is just another one of those things that was basically taught in school that turns out to be backwards. My mind will need to adjust to the logical method of acquiring information.
I use this at the shopping malls this time of year, with all those annoying booth operators that are always coming up to you and asking, "Can I ask you a question?" in hopes to trap you into a sales pitch. I reply, "You just did" and walk away, making a clean escape while their mind seizes.
This is comedy gold. I laughed out loud really hard reading this.
"Classical historians traditionally dismiss tales of magic as unworthy of scholarly attention, but to us any mention of a witch's broomstick or wizard's wand evokes the smell of a scientist's laboratory." The Sphinx and the Megaliths

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